Thursday, February 7, 2013

Communal area around the pool has a re-vamp

Our local council occasionally will give out free plants, and about a year ago I got a bunch of assorted plants to plant around the pool.  I laid out wet newspaper, and put mulch on top of that, then let that sit for a couple of weeks.   Then I dug out a trench and filled it with my own homemade compost, and added chook poo, which does stink up the place a bit, but oh gosh, it does the soil good. :)  Then I let that sit for a couple of weeks before I planted them.
This is the communal area for our set of 10 units, and I took it upon myself to make it look a bit more inviting and tropical.
So the ground was prepared, here in the central traffic island,
 And around the pool


the plants I got were;
Dianella - a flax lilly that has blue flowers on spikes
Lomandra longifolia - a native grass that grows up to half a metre
a couple of green cordelines
 a couple of miniature weeping callistemon (bottlebrush)
2 purple tibouchina.
12 lilly pilly bushes for a hedge on the street side
From a  neighbour I got about 24 spider lilies that I put between the palms trees leading to the pool gate.
I gave them all a good soaking in seaweed tea and then planted them.  They have had an occasional watering, and also a few more plants have been added whenever I had extra in my garden, but basically it was meant to be no maintenance..... . This is what it looks like now.

and the area around the pool:
the spider lilies really love the rainy season - here is a close up of the flower so you can see why they are named spider lilies.
I suppose this could be called geurilla gardening - all I know is that when we go for a swim after work it is lovely to be surrounded by tropical foliage rather than bare fences.   Once the initial planting was done, there is very little maintenance to keep it looking nice.

29 comments:

  1. If that's geurilla gardening there should be more of it. What a difference. I bet everyone in your complex is pleased with how great it looks now.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Roz,
      As in life some like it, some dont and some dont care....

      Delete
  2. I love the idea of guerrilla gardening. Nice job.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kathryn,
      I am thinking of sticking in a few veggies since this is a sunny area - now that will probably raise a few eyebrows!

      Delete
  3. I remember when you first posted about this, and your efforts have made a fantastic difference. Both spots just look a whole lot better and you chose some hardy plants that will last for ages and ages.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bernie,
      Yes the idea was to use low maintenance plants, and it is marvellous to have the blog to look back and see the progress.

      Delete
  4. The plants look fantastic and I'm sure they are truly appreciated. I believe I see bromeliads in there? Some of my favorite "tough guy" plants. You did a beautiful job!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Lesa,
      yes teh bromeliads are great to just plop down anywhere arent they>

      Delete
  5. Good on you! I love a bit of guerilla gardening.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well done. This is a huge improvement.

      Delete
    2. Veggiegobbler,
      I remember you doing your sidewalk verge - how is that going?

      Delete
  6. What a wonderful person you are to do this for your communal area, I am sure it is very much appreciated. I also enjoy reading your words of wisdom on the right hand side of your blog, they are a reminder of how precious every day is. Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. September cottage,
      I think I ger more pleasure than anyone else! It is a nice place to collect those words of wisdom! Glad you like them

      Delete
  7. I did a lot of this type of planting. In some places you can get away with it, other places don't like it. I had trouble on my street because when I planted in the verge, pedestrians would rip them out or take them home. I had to install a camera to stop them doing it!
    Good work

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. adam,
      Oh gosh how sad! It is sad that we cannot expect everyone to leave things for others to enjoy.

      Delete
  8. Oh my, you have done a wonderful job!! You are an angel.
    Question for you: Is it just you that has taken an interest in making these areas look more attractive?
    It's always only one or a few persons who will take an active interest in their communal surroundings, while others sit back and lament how awful the area looks.
    Love how nice it all looks now.
    I'd love to see a photo of the Dianella flax lily in bloom.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Virginia,
      Yes it is just silly old me (and my hubby) but in reality it does improve the value of the whole set of units so we all benefit. some of the other owners are very appreciative, others dont care.

      Delete
  9. How wonderful it looks! I'm sure everyone must be so pleased with the results. Hope all or some of the residents gave you a hand.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sami,
      No it is my baby, but as I said now there is really no maintenance.

      Delete
  10. I love those flowers. I have been trying to find some great flowers for my pool. Austin pool service, my pool service company, recommends using orchids because they are more resilient to additional sunlight that can be emitted from the pool. I am going to do a little more research, but I figure this would be a good place to start.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Brendan,
      I dont see where you live think it might be Austin Texas. - these plants like a tropical climate itmight be a bit dry in your area.

      Delete
  11. I wish I had a spider lily! Unfortunately, I haven't seen them anywhere in Poland. They look beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Looks good. Just wondering about how you make seaweed tea. Is it just a matter of seaweed sitting in a bucket of water for awhile? How long? Anything else I should understand about it. I throw a bit of sea weed in the garden as I pick up bits on the beach but have never thought of making seaweed tea. Will have to try it out. aloha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. stellamarina,
      Yes I steep seaweed in a bit of water for a couple of weeks - have to cover it because of mosquitoes. It does get smelly, but the garden loves it as s foliar feed. Latley I have become quite lazy and jsut add it to the compost or use it as a mulch.

      Delete
    2. Thanks .....will have to try it out. Maybe I will throw a bit of comfrey in with it too.

      Delete
  13. Hello, my Dear! I've come to you from The "Grow Your Blog" party...it was over before I knew about it, but it was so nice of Vicki to leave the list up! Anyway, I always welcome new blogs to enjoy, and yours is delightful! I am now following you ~ please come and visit me if you get a chance!
    So nice to "meet" you!
    Hugs,
    Anne

    ReplyDelete
  14. Dearest africanaussie,
    Oh, geurilla gardening; never heard of it p;) How wonderful to see spider lilies and I'm so moved by the phrase you said "it is lovely to be surrounded by tropical foliage rather than bare fences"♡♡♡

    Have a happy coming Valentine's Day.
    Sending you lots of love and hugs from Japan, xoxo Miyako*

    ReplyDelete

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