Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Massive pruning of the lychee tree

Here I sit at work while the lychee tree is being trimmed.  As I discussed before, this is something that needs to be done occasionally , and in fact is long overdue.
My hubby sent this photo first; and my heart sank - it is actually just as well I am not there....

then this photo arrived - wow I never realized we were talking about so much of the tree being trimmed.  He is a professional and so I have to trust what he is doing, but my gosh that is a lot of the tree.

My hubby wasn't sure whether to send me a photo of the ground, I am hoping this is all on the pavers, and no branches have landed on my plants, but I know that thought is not realistic.

We have already taken any plants that were in pots around to the back along with the gazebo.  I have a shade cloth that I will hang over the more tender plants, but I think it is going to be a while until  the garden is looking "normal" again......I might be very sad for a while, and busy.

23 comments:

  1. Oh Geez! That kind of work on trees is always traumatic. And then to have to worry about the state of what's under it makes it even worse. I hope the damage isn't too bad. I recently spent some time reworking an area of my garden that got somewhat trashed way back in February when we had plumbing problems, and had to have part of the garden dug up. So I know how you are looking on this with a sinking heart. Keeping my fingers crossed for you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alison,
      I know, a garden can cause lots of worry cant it? At least it is done now - I think worrying about what can happen is sometimes worse than the actual result.

      Delete
  2. Ouch. I hope your garden hasn't been squished under those branches.
    I know the first thing you'll be doing when you get home.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Missy,
      Sure did... I was out there until dark.

      Delete
  3. Wow! That is a lot of tree and mess too. I'm sure the plants will be fine. They are generally togher than we think.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Fingers crossed that things won't be too bad for you when you reach home to take a closer look. The reality though is it's far better to get the job done and put up with some squashed plants for a while, then to let it go. Far safer in our corner of the world, especially when they cyclone season arrives.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bernie,
      Quite right, there were a lot of branches that might have come flying off in a cyclone. My hubby said there was a kookaburra sitting just above the tree lopper directing operations!

      Delete
  5. Wow. What a huge job. I absolutely love lychees, but I had no idea they grew so big. Hope everything below is okay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Marisa,
      this one had been allowed to have its own way for too long.

      Delete
  6. It looks like it threw very dense shade under it; maybe by pruning it you can grow some more sun lovers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adam,
      In this climate we take all the shade we can! Hopefully by summer it will be a a shady backyard once again.

      Delete
  7. Wow..
    That is a big tree - never seen a lychee tree before.
    Didn't know it can grow that big.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. James,
      I love big trees.. I would think they would grow in Malaysia.

      Delete
  8. Oh my goodness. I would have been in tears. I hope you plants are ok and not squished.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sueb,
      some were squished, and my heart sank when I first saw it, but I think most things will recover.

      Delete
  9. My goodness, that is a big tree. I hope everything came through with as little damage as possible, I know how nerve-wracking taking trees and limbs down can be. And the end result is always so startling at first, until you get used to it. You may be very pleasantly surprised by the addition of some sunshine to your garden, though. I had a wonderful time strolling through your garden and the posts I've missed. I love the hibiscus and all the pictures of your beautiful, lush garden. And I agree heartily that it is truly a wonderful thing you are able to have instant communication with your children who are far away!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Karen,
      At the moment I have put up a few shade cloths to try and reduce the shock to the plants. Glad you enjoyed looking back at old posts - I do that too :)

      Delete
  10. Those photos give me a knot in my stomach, I can't imagine how you feel. Do you have a before and after photo of the tree to post? I'd be interested to see the full extent and then we can all enjoy watching it grow back over the next couple of years.

    I'm sure the plants underneath will survive - that's one nice thing about the tropics, if it grows in that climate, it really grows!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laura,
      I will post a final photo, but only after a bit more tidying up has been done. I am hoping the plants will not get too scorched by the sun now, but feel that in the end it will all be fine.

      Delete
  11. Dearest africanaussie,
    Wow, yes it sure must have been a huge work☆☆☆ And, I DO cross my fingers for your lychee tree!!! As you said your husband is a professional.
    Please take Care of your precious tropical type plants for the winter; I don't have pace for them and cannot have them, (^^;)
    Love you always, xoxo Miyako*

    ReplyDelete
  12. Orchid,
    No my husband did not cut the tree down - this man is a professional tree lopper and says we will soon start seeing green leaves - I hope so! It is looking a bit sad at the moment but hopefully soon I will be posting photos of a lush tropical garden again.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Don't dispair it will bounce back in no time, hopefully the rest of the garden did'nt suffer, only your nerves.....

    ReplyDelete

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