Friday, June 15, 2012

The beginning

When I began my gardening journey almost 3 years ago, this blog did not exist, and I began to search the web for any information I could find about building up the soil and starting a new garden.   All I had a was a small garden with a lychee tree in the middle.

I discovered Kitchen Gardeners International and found a wonderful group of very chatty members from all around the globe.   I learnt so much, and every morning would sign in to see what new information I could glean from the very clever gardeners who regularly posted tips and answered questions.  I learned about heirloom plants, lasagne gardening and things like wilt and soap spray to control bugs.  I had found a gardening community!!!  I live in a  remote area so there are not too many gardeners I can discuss things with over the back fence.  I began a blog on site, and then I discovered blogger and created this blog,  and nothing has been the same since!  I do occasionally go back to KGI, but the format has changed.  Like most things in life, there are changes, some good, some bad.
 What has not changed is the founder Roger Doiron's commitment to creating kitchen gardens worldwide.   Kate from Vegetable Vagabond alerted me to the  new program created on KGI called sow it forward.   Please check it out and make a donation if you feel so inclined.   Here is a short slide show to showcase the marvelous work they do. The garden of hope in Goa India 
The thought I was left with after viewing that slideshow is how a little bit of inspiration and help in the beginning inspires you to do more, so much more than you initially thought possible.


This is what the lychee tree looks like now after pruning, and I am  going to be busy getting the lovely tropical garden below it back in order.  Luckily this is the tropics, and I have the weather on my side, and thanks to all my online gardening friends I know that gardening involves change.  The leaves will grow back on my tree healthier and happier, and the gutters will stay clean and free of leaves.

19 comments:

  1. Wow! I am astounded by the shot of your house with just the lychee tree in the middle of the grass! You have made some amazing gardens there. The pruned tree now has a very nice shape, I think they did a good job on it. I hope not too much stuff was crushed under it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Alison,
      my first impression was that it was a total disaster, but after a weekend working on it, things are looking a bit more positive.

      Delete
  2. Ouch - that is a prune. But the structure of the tree looks fantastic and I'm sure it will grow full of leaves and fruit within a year.

    What a transformation you've made to your garden from that first, bare photo. Pat youself on the back - but don't rest on your laurels, it sounds like you've got a lot of work out there - get goin' girl :-)

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    Replies
    1. Laura,
      Oh you are a hard task master....

      Delete
  3. Your Lychee tree will soon grow back. A good prune promotes healthy growth I always say (especially after my husband has been out with the loppers.) You have achieved such a lot in your garden.

    It's wonderful to connect with other enthusiastic gardeners all around the world. Like you I have made so many gardening friends since I began blogging.
    Have a good weekend.

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    Replies
    1. Sueb,
      Oh I wouldn't let my hubby lose with the loppers! Blogging really does bring a whole new dimension to gardening.

      Delete
  4. That Lychee tree will come beack better thatn ever after such a good pruning! It was a beautiful big tree!

    Sorry I haven't been able to comment on your blog for ages, but today I played around with my computer and managed to get it right again using internet explorer instead of Google chrome :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tania,
      Oh gosh I hope Chrome is not going to start causing problems now... I always feel I should try to learn more about what I do here in blogland. I often fiddle around as if I have a blindfold on. Glad to see you back in action.

      Delete
  5. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  6. Hey your lychee tree is lookin' good after that pruning! Just remember to count which branches from the base up, to grade which ones are qualified to be pruned. You don't want to prune some of the most base branches, but pruning is always necessary to promote good tree growth.

    -Tony Salmeron
    Tree Service Charlotte

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Tony,
      I didn't even question how he pruned - even though if it had been up to me I would have left longer branches to protect my tender plants... Hopefully the tree thanks me.

      Delete
  7. It's amazing just how far your garden has come since your gardening journey began three years ago. I think the gardening blogging world is just wonderful. There's so many fabulous gardens to visit and interesting, supportive gardeners to meet. That Lychee tree will come back better than ever. It's had a great trim back.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bernie,
      That is one of the great things about blogging is being able to look back yourself. all the marvelous friends you meet along the way are like the cherry on the top!

      Delete
  8. Comparing your photo of your gardens beginnings to the lush tropical foliage garden you have created, I have no doubt it will be looking absolutely fabulous again in no time at all.

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    Replies
    1. Marisa,
      well probably not no time at all - I will post some more photos tomorrow.

      Delete
  9. Dearest africanaussie,
    We ask gardener to prune our pine tree and so on once a year (because of his handicap of his legs, he cannot do the job for the tall tree) I always feel that the gardener trimming too much, haha.
    Every one is saying your lychee tree will be looking wonderful. How wonderful you broaden your world of gardening through blogging♡♡♡
    Lots of love and hugs from Japan, xoxo Miyako

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Miyako,
      I do think trimming back a little bit at a time is probably better, but this tree had just been left to go its own way for too long!

      Delete
  10. I love the shape of the Lychee tree now, it will be beautiful when it starts to green up.

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  11. The Lychee prune job looks great. The initial shock is ugh!! But it'll be fine and you'll be glad you did it. Your lychee is as sacred as our Live Oaks here. I was get nervous when they get pruned....but they look fantastic after it's all said and done. Enjoy!!

    ReplyDelete

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