Monday, April 26, 2010

Pink in the tropics

I have a lot of red flowers in my garden,  but this weekend, pink seemed to be the colour of choice.
The sliver of orange peeks out ready to erupt into multicoloured heleconia.
A different type of cordeline - this type has large very leathery feeling leaves

and a close up of the wonderful colours inside the new leaf

My cordeline in full sun in the front garden has turned very pink.  I think this aswers my question as to whether they have better colour in sunshine.  I am thinking of moving all my cordleines (or most of them) from the deep shade to alongside the wooden fence which looks quite bare now that the shade cloth is gone.

This little pink foliage plant is easy to propogate from cutting and I have it scattered around the garden. I love the way it looks next to the cordeline leaf.
The central rib is quite  a stunning hot pink shade.
as you can see from the photos we are having quite  a bit of sunshine.  The plants seem to have got used to all the rain and are wilting midday, but then recover later.  I guess they will have a period of adjustment. 
PS   I just got the name iresine or bloodleaf for this plant, (from Bernie) so will add it for future reference.

7 comments:

  1. I love those cordylines! I've found that they color better in more sun, you have to give them plenty of time to get used to it. I think I might have a similar heliconia to yours by the way... what kind is it?

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  2. Used to have the Heliconia. They were prolific in the hot summertime but looked bad as soon as it began to cool down in the winter here.Your Cordyline plants do look outstanding. I also like the color they display.

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  3. Rainforest gardener,
    Yes I have been wondering about why I planted cordleines in the deep shade. I have seen that heleconia called Lady Di. I thought I did a post on the name but now I can't find it.
    Sanddune,
    As each spike flowers, it dies, and needs to be cut down. I was hoping this was the clumping type, but it is spreading, so now that summer is over I am going to have to get all the runners and cut them back. so they do take a bit of maintenance, but I love the fact that the flowers stay looking good for a long time.

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  4. Those are very hot pinks in your garden, love them all! What is the name of the plant in the last picture, so gorgeous! Looks that is something I can grow in my garden :)

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  5. Gorgeous pinks! I think putting the cordylines out in more sun will definitely bring out their colour. That last plant looks like an iresine or what we call 'blood leaf' ... they have the most beautiful beetroot red middle vein.

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  6. Well, Ami, there I was,pondering how to tell you that I have no clue what that plant is, since I started it from a cutting I snipped out of a roadside garden, and Bernie shows up! Thanks Bernie! yes bloodleaf sounds about right as a description. Hope you can find it Ami. One of my cordelines a friend gave me was a pale even pink, and it is now green with pink edges, so shade definitely does something to the colour. Out into the sunshine they will go. Maybe this weekend if it ever stops raining... sigh.

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  7. The cordylines are beautiful at the moment. I have a few but they are on tall bare stems. I sometimes cut them off and replant the top and the old stem often reshoots too, but I'm always a bit hesitant. Mine have flower stalks growing out the middle too. I must try and blog them one day.

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