Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Seeds of freedom and a giveaway

I just watched a film that Kate at vegetable vagabond posted.  You can view it here - Seeds of Freedom.



I have always been worried about genetically modified seeds, and this answered a lot of my questions.

Seed is nature's gift, not an invention.  Nobody should be allowed to patent seeds as far as I am concerned.

This amaranth that adds lovely color to my salads pops up regularly in my garden.  It was first planted by a packet of seeds that Kate sent me about 3 years ago.  It adds diversity to my garden and diet and amaranth is one of the oldest heirloom seeds in the world.  I think we as gardeners have a responsibility to make sure that seeds like this never die out.

Listening to the dates of when genetically modified seeds were first patented ties in so tightly with the advent of the current globesity and diabetes epidemic I can't help thinking that this is all interconnected.
Dill is lovely in the garden - it attracts bees and other pollinators, and you can eat the leaves and seeds.  I use the leaves in my salads and the seeds in my bread. I generally don't plant it - there are always a few seeds that fall off and start another plant somewhere in my garden.

 I always leave a couple of lettuces to go to seed, and just cut off the stalk full of seeds.  I allow that to dry in the air, and then  keep the seeds in an envelope so that I can replant the following year.  If you buy heirloom seeds to start with then they will come back true to form every time.
My glorious pumpkin vine grew out of seeds in the compost - how great is that?

 One year I planted yellow cosmos, and now it appears everywhere.  I leave it unless it is taking up valuable space because of the lovely butterflies and pollinators it attracts.


There is such a wonderful feeling deep down in my soul when I gather vegetables from my garden, and prepare a meal, and I know what has been added to those vegetables and fruit.  Every year my garden gets better and better, and I truly believe it is because I am feeding the soil which in turn feeds my plants.  I love this feeling of being in touch with nature.  Every seed that I plant becomes a miracle that I have the honor of witnessing and being a part of.  The purple asparagus which I grew from seed sends out bigger, thicker and healthier stalks than the two year crowns that I planted at the same time.  How is that possible?

Sending seeds in and out of Australia is prohibited, but if any of my Australian readers would like some seeds please e-mail me - my address is at the bottom of my blog page.  Please head the e-mail  - seeds of freedom - so they are not ignored along with the junk mail.  I have rosella, luffa, and yellow cosmos.  In turn I ask that you "pass it on" and offer to share some of your seeds with others.  I have found that the more diverse my garden is, the better the harvest.  

18 comments:

  1. Its heartening to hear about your seeds germinating into strong healthy plants. You must be doing the right thing by your garden. Too bad I'm from out of Australia, otherwise I would have like to share seeds with you.

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    Replies
    1. Stiletto,
      I know, I am still not convinced we should not be sharing seeds across continents to create even more diversity, but hopefully this will change eventually.

      Delete
  2. Such a great post. I would love some rosella seeds. I am going to be offering up some asian green seeds later this week too. I will email you my details.

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    Replies
    1. Hi Fiona,
      I have used two of the cards, and both of the recipients loved them! You are very talented! I will send off your rosella seeds this week.

      Delete
  3. Don't get me started on those big companies producing genetically modified seeds. When I first became aware of the situation was when the news story broke that some religious fanatics were stockpiling food to last for many years when Armageddon came...they were also saving these genetically modified seeds as well.
    I tend to agree with you that since their introduction we have been inundated with an increase of diseases worldwide.
    The thing is, is that in some instances, folks were not even made aware that they were purchasing these seeds (although in some instances they had no other choice), because if they knew, they could perhaps make better choices.
    By the way, I love everything that is going on in your garden right now....nice work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Virginia,
      Oh I know, and it is so sad to see how these huge corporations can subtly integrate themselves into our lives. Simple living, saving our own seeds, and growing our own veggies looks like a better and better option every day :)

      Delete
  4. Great post full of gardening loveliness.
    However I am a bit worried about your asparagus fern. I understood that is has been declared a noxious weed and we are advised to eliminate it from out gardens. Is this only in some states of Australia? What does your local Landcare group know about this? Around here no nurseries sell this plant and certainly no Open Garden would use it. Asparagus fern can do enormous damage to the environment and spreads very quickly due to the root structure. In your soil and climate zone this could easily be a problem.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Louise,
      The asparagus fern is just an ornamental - the one I have is the edible asparagus. It does have a different root structure - with a "crown", not running roots. Thanks for bringing that up - it is important that we watch out for noxious weeds.

      Delete
  5. Really love the way the dill looks in your garden.
    Never seen one up close nor a life living one.

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    Replies
    1. James Oh I would think you would be able to grow it in Malaysia. In the dry season

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  6. Everything in your vegie patch looks so delicious and healthy. I especially love the dainty foliage of the dill and its starry flowers, and the fact it is such a great herb is an added bonus.

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  7. Marisa,
    Thank you, yes dill is a real favourite of mine - ever since I first tasted it fresh in a salad. The seeds have an entirely different flavor!

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  8. I have beautiful yellow cosmos from your last give away. I collected seed and they've self seeded. I am trying to mix them with my sunflowers for a big brother-little brother look. That luffa looks very interesting...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Laurs,
      Oh I like the sound of the sunflowers and cosmos together - I look forward to seeing photos.

      Delete
  9. Your garden is a pleasure to behold! I think your affection and dedication are the reasons to germinate so much life and beauty. There is no greater reward than planting and harvesting, and be caring nature. Continue sowing and for sharing our joy!
    Hugs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ma Zelia,
      thank you, I certainly get lots of pleasure out of it.

      Delete
  10. Dearest africanaussie,
    Oh, I DO admire the way you said, "I love this feeling of being in touch with nature." Haha, I never knew amaranth, dill; Yes, your pumpkin is gorgeous and LOVE the yellow cosmos very much♡♡♡ It is rare color, isn't it as we don't see these where I live.
    You always make me surprise with your expertise, my friend♬♬♬
    Sending you lots of love and hugs from Japan, xoxo Miyako*

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Miyako,
      Yes funny in the past I have found the pink cosmos to be more prolific, but when I plant that in my garden it never self seeds like the yellow one does. Oh I am not an expert - I feel I am often fumbling around in the dark.

      Delete

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