Friday, October 4, 2013

Garden Share Collective October

all posts will be up and running October 7th
I have joined the garden share collective group -  at strayed from the table
If you are anything like me you will find much of interest on her site besides the group. Beautiful recipes, travels, farming etc. The aim is to get a group of bloggers posting regularly about their garden achievements and goals, and checking back every month to see how we have all done.  What a great way to be accountable and to meet other bloggers.
Planting:
As summer approaches our veggie garden takes a turn towards more tropical vegetables. The galangal, turmeric and ginger that has been dormant will sense the hot humid weather is approaching and send up its shoots. The ginger and turmeric die right down and I often think that there is an empty spot that I should plant something in.  :)  I uncovered the mulch and there is turmeric under here but you wouldn't know it!  I think I will move it though as it might crowd out my new little coffee tree.

I have planted long beans* and I will put in some winged beans*, both do really well during the wet season, and since I added more trellises there is plenty of room for them to climb.
I also planted some soy beans - I have never grown them before and they seem to be doing well- some are already flowering and they don't seem to grow very high - more like a bush bean.  I am looking forward to some edamame :)
We have bacterial wilt in the soil so it is always a problem to grow tomatoes (other than the cherry tomatoes) and eggplant. these thai pink egg seem to be doing OK in a little pot filled with potting soil.


The eggplant in the wicking beds are still struggling - not sure why - I popped a few comfrey leaves into the water inlet hoping they will get a bit of nutrition that way.  I would like to add some compost but scared of getting the bacterial wilt into the soil.  I think the compost from the tumbler should be OK.
I put up the shade cloth, although with the trellises and paw paw tree it was hard to figure out where it could go...

I have passionfuit and loofah* making their way up the big happy plant at the back.  They fall down from a dizzy height when ready, luckily.
I am also trying to get some rosella started - I like to dry them for tea, but last year I didn't realize how late they flowered.  This time I will plant them out of the way against the back fence.
Harvesting:
 Still harvesting lettuces, rocket, amaranth and bok choy as I continuously sowed them which was a great idea.  I will do that again.  I have let some go to seed so I have plenty of seed for next year.
I have cut back the asparagus fronds (as they don't die down in this climate) and picked our first harvest. yummy goodness.  I must get some seaweed for mulch  - they love that.  The purple asparagus is amazing, and I grew that from seed!  I would like to start some more seeds, as a few of the other plants put out very spindly stalks, but they no longer seem to be available.
Oh I almost forgot!   my most amazing exciting harvest!  3 figs :) :) happy, happy me!


To Do
I must get some seaweed mulch for the asparagus bed.
I have been collecting the next lot of compost for the tumbler in a bin, since it is not recommended to keep adding to the tumbler. As a batch is finished I add it to my old open bottomed compost bin so the worms can gather there and finish it off.  I add leaves but even so it does attract fruit flies, even though it is covered, and I don't want to attract cockroaches, so am thinking of making a bokashi mix to sprinkle over the top.
I am having to continually feed the choko vine back through the fence as it wants to creep through to the neighbours yard.  This is the first year I seem to be having a bit of success with a choko vine, and now it wants to escape. Everyone says they are so easy to grow!  These lovely yellow cosmos are great for attracting butterflies to the garden. *
I need to do some general cutting back before the wet season when everything grows out of control anyway.  The herb spiral definitely needs a good trimming.


Seeds to swap
long beans, loofah, winged beans, yellow cosmos.

33 comments:

  1. A very productive garden you have! Inspired to plant more this weekend :)

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  2. I love this idea. I am going to charge my camera up and join in! I have so many plans for the garden, this seems like a great way to keep me motivated.

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  3. I live in a tropical area and whenever my compost is ready to use, I lay in under the sun for one or two days. i like to things that this kills some bacteria. I used themicrowave method before but it's too time consuming

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  4. It is so nice to see new little plants just starting to come up in your garden as we here in New Hampshire are in our fall season now. sorry I haven't popped by recently, gosh it so hard to keep up with all the lovely blogs I follow. When I don't make it over know that I am still thinking about you!
    Hugs from your New Hampshire blogging sister!
    Beth P

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    Replies
    1. Beth,
      I know it is hard to keep up, and lately I find the blogger feed hard to manage, but slowly moving over to bloglovin which I think might be better.

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  5. Your group sounds like it will be a lot of fun. Vegetables are looking good...love the long beans but have never tried them. Nor, have I ever tried soybeans. How do you prepare the soybeans?

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    Replies
    1. Susan,
      those long beans do great in our hot and humid climate - I am sure you would be able to grow them as well. Evidently you just steam the soy beans pods and all, then salt them and serve them cold when you just pop out the pods and eat them.

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  6. I love the idea of a coffee plant. I will follow with interest to see how you go with it. What sort of volume does one plant produce? Lovely to have you as part of the Garden Share Collective :-)

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    1. Hi Kyristie,
      yes it is fun finding a whole bunch of new gardening friends...I love the recipes you posted - will definietly be trying the asparagus frittata.

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  7. Glad to have you on board Gillian, your garden is thriving, with so much variety too. How old are your fig trees, I want to know how long I will be waiting for mine to fruit.
    Also I would love to try a couple of loofah seeds as an experiment.

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    Replies
    1. thanks Liz for organizing it all. Sure, send me your address and I will get some seeds over to you. You probably should plant them straight away,and make sure they get plenty of water. I have one little fig in a pot - have had it for about 3 years, but it was in a fairly shady spot. Once I moved it into the sun against a fence it suddenly put out fruit!

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  8. Such a lovely garden! Thank-you for stopping by my blog earlier :-)
    I've never grown loofah seeds - they always look quite interesting! Happy gardening! Sarah x

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    Replies
    1. Sarah Jane,
      thank you, the loofah love our hot and humid climate so if you think you can replicate that let me know and I will send you some seed.

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  9. what a gorgeous garden! I just had to google Thai Pink Egg toms as I've never heard of them before and now I want to add them to my collection! I'm a bit tomato crazy at the moment :) Great post x

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    1. Gourmet wog,
      We have real trouble with bacterial wilt in the soil which affects tomatoes,and I was thinking if they grow in Thailand they might not be so picky about our climate I think I got the seeds from Eden seeds.

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  10. I'm intrigued with some of your plantings - coffee plant and soy beans in particular. Your garden looks lush and lovely :)

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    Replies
    1. thank you Jacqui,
      I probably will only grow enough to make some chocolate covered coffee beans, not a full cup of coffee, but I love to grow unusual things. The soy beans are doing well - it is a new plant for me.

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  11. I love coming here because you grow so many interesting things. Plants that would never survive in my gardens.

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    1. That is the joy of following blogs around the world Carolyn. I always enjoy your posts for the same reason, and also for your talent in matching beautiful words to your photos.

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  12. Your garden is so exotic compared to my lettuces, silver beet, broccoli..... It's just beautiful!

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    1. Linda,
      thank you, but I wouldnt mind being able to grow more "regular" vegetables :)

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  13. As always an interesting post.....you never disappoint.
    I'm glad that you've joined a group. but you are already accountable to us your blog readers with your gardening efforts.....love everything that you're doing.

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    1. Virginia,
      Sometimes I look out at all the weeds and think - Oh dear, I will have to do some weeding in order to take some photos for my blog - so that is a good thing ;)

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  14. I'm so envious of you growing tumeric and garlic!

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    1. Becs,
      I know of a gardener who grows tumeric in a greenhouse in Tasmania, so you might give it a try. Garlic I cant grow - the aliums all need a spurt of cold which we never get here.

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  15. hello AA, i'm finally here at your blog! i love seeing the flowers in amongst your crops - so ramblign and lovely.
    the word that leapt out at me however was 'choko'... swoon! you took me back to my childhood, where we grew up in NSW and had a choko vine down the back. i remember simply cooked chokos, spikes and all, loaded with butter and salt and pepper. dad has never grown chokos here in hobart so i assume they are not a cold-climate vegie but... thanks for reminding me of them!

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    1. Welcome,
      I do hope I get some chokos - I am thinking that the progress being slow might relate to the fact that it is so dry here lately. That is the way most people remember eating them.

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  16. My marigolds look like your cosmos. Are they same thing? Your garden has so much growth!

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    1. Melissa,
      Pink cosmos is the most common I think, but they all grow long and spindly with fine feathery leaves. Marigolds are normally more compact and with more petals on the flowers. Both are great at attracting benefial insects though!

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  17. Your garden looks wonderfully productive. We also struggle growing chokos, apparently one of the easiest things to grow!. Not enough water in our case I think.

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    1. Now that we have had a bit of rain I think you might be right - it put out another shoot and this one looks much healthier, so holding thumbs.

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  18. I haven't seen the flowers of the last picture.
    Varigated Indian Borage.
    Usually its a hot item - the common all green type where I often use it when the children are having cough & flu.

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    Replies
    1. very interesting James, my hubby and I both have the flu at the moment so I might give it a try. they say the best way is to steep a couple of leaves in a cup of water before bed.

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